• Effective rehabilitation and treatment

Effective treatment and rehabilitation of the elbow

The elbow joint is comprised of three joints enclosed inside a capsule and bound together by muscles, tendons, and ligaments. There are several causes to elbow pain. A common cause is tendinitis, which is an inflammation or trauma to the tendons that fasten muscle to bone. Although tendinitis of the elbow is most commonly a sports injury, ordinarily from playing tennis or golf, it is also due to repetitive overuse activities of the elbow. Other culprits of elbow pain consist of sprains, strains, fractures, dislocations, bursitis, and arthritis.

Most Common Elbow Conditions

Tennis elbow
Golfer’s elbow
Little leaguer’s elbow

Tennis elbow

Lateral epicondylitis (most commonly referred to as "tennis elbow"), is an inflammation of the connective tissues (tendons, ligaments, or nerves) on the outer portion of the elbow and forearm. This ailment happens when the extensor musculature of the wrist and hand are consistently and repetitively overused and cause pain, swelling and discomfort in the forearm and elbow joint. Lateral epicondylitis is one of many repetitive overuse injuries that can cause pain in your elbow, may develop without trauma or overuse, and can stem from activities other than tennis where unordinary strenuous activity involves the arm and hand.

Signs and symptoms of tennis elbow

  • Severe sharp pain extending from the outside of your elbow into your forearm and wrist
  • Pain during: wrist extension, twisting and turning (especially to the outside), pressing on the outside of your elbow which progressively worsens
  • Pain and discomfort from lifting objects of any weight
  • A weak or painful grip while shaking hands or turning a doorknob

Golfer’s elbow

Golfer’s elbow is commonly referred to as medial epicondylitis. Medial epicondyltis is pain and inflammation of the inner portion of the elbow. Golfer’s elbow is similar to tennis elbow in the fact that affects the connective tissues of the elbow including the tendons, muscles and ligaments. It also occurs on the inside of the elbow rather than the outside and involves the wrist flexor muscles and forearm. Anyone who frequently uses their wrists or clenches their fingers may develop medial epicondyltis.

Concept Chiropractic’s management approach to golfer’s elbow

The earlier you consult us at Concept Chiropractic and Rehab and seek treatment for golfer’s elbow, the sooner you’ll be able to resume your normal activities of daily living. Rest is often warranted until the pain is eliminated. Depending on how severe your condition is, the pain may persist for several months, even if you rest and perform your prescribed home exercises for your arm. In some cases, the elbow pain may persist long term and become a chronic condition.

Little leaguer’s elbow

A tender elbow is very common in baseball. The motions involved in throwing and pitching a ball produce large forces during the acceleration portion of the throw, making muscle and bone vulnerable to injury. In young baseball players, frequent throwing may also cause elbow injuries that can harm the growth plate

Signs and symptoms of little leaguer’s elbow

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Loud "pop" or "giving way" of the elbow joint
  • Incapability of straightening the elbow
  • Soreness inside the elbow

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